“Vergiftete Pfeilspitzen waren historisch einerseits zur Jagd vorgesehen, zum Beispiel um im unwegsamen Urwaldgelände eine Flucht der Beute zu verhindern, oder mit schwachen Bögen auch große Beute zu erlegen. Andererseits wurden sie zu Kriegszwecken genutzt, um die Wirkung nicht unmittelbar tödlicher Treffer zu erhöhen. In Europa und Japan war der Einsatz von Giftpfeilen jedoch als "unritterlich" verpönt (was den gelegentlichen Einsatz nicht ausschloss). Als Gift dienten in Südamerika zum Beispiel Curare und das Hautsekret von Pfeilgiftfröschen, in Europa zum Beispiel Extrakte des Eisenhuts. Das im Hundertjährigen Krieg in Frankreich aufkommende Gerücht, die Engländer würden ihre Pfeile vergiften, lässt sich u.U. darauf zurückführen, dass die engl. Schützen ihre Pfeile zur Bereitschaft für schnelles Schießen vor sich in den Boden steckten, wodurch z.B. Sporen von Wundstarrkrampf- und Gasbranderregern in die verursachten Wunden gelangen konnten.“
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"Ruhephase, Verzicht, Rückzug aus dem aktiven Leben, Unterwerfung, Verschnaufpause, Überdenken der eigenen Situation, gedankliche Bindung."
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"Patience and fortitude are prominent themes in Judaism. The Talmud extols patience as an important personal trait. The story of Micah, for example, is that he suffers many challenging conditions and yet endures, saying "I will wait for the God who saves me." Patience in God, it is said, will aid believers in finding the strength to be delivered from the evils that are inherent in the physical life. …
In the Christian religion, patience is one of the most valuable virtues of life. Increasing patience is viewed as the work of the Holy Ghost in the Christian who has accepted the gift of salvation. While patience is not one of the traditional biblical three theological virtues nor one of the traditional cardinal virtues, it is part of the fruit of the Holy Spirit, according to the Apostle Paul in his Epistle to the Galatians. …
Patience with steadfast belief in Allah is called sabr (Arabic: صْبِرْ ṣabr‎), one of the best virtues of life in Islam. Through sabr, a Muslim believes that an individual can grow closer to God and thus attain true peace. It is also stressed in Islam, that Allah is with those who are patient, more specifically during calamity and suffering. Several verses in Quran urge Muslims to seek Allah's help when faced with fear and loss, with patient prayers and perseverance for Allah.
In Buddhism, patience (Skt.: kshanti; Pali: khanti) is one of the "perfections" (paramitas) that a bodhisattva trains in and practices to realize perfect enlightenment (bodhi). The Buddhist concept of patience is distinct from the English definition of the word. In Buddhism, patience refers to not returning harm, rather than merely enduring a difficult situation. It is the ability to control one's emotions even when being criticized or attacked. In verse 184 of the Dhammapada it is said that 'enduring patience is the highest austerity'.
Patience and forbearance is considered an essential virtue in Hinduism. In ancient literature of Hinduism, the concept of patience is referred to with the word pariksaha (patience and forbearance, Sanskrit: परिषहा), and several other words such as sahiṣṇutā (patient toleration, Sanskrit: सहिष्णुता), titiksha (forbearance, Sanskrit: तितिक्षा), sah or sahanshilata (suffer with patience, Sanskrit: सह, सहनशीलता) and several others."
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"The word treble is used, especially in British English, to mean the singing voice of a boy or girl. Often it is called boy soprano, but since there are also many girls who sing in cathedral and church choirs these days, the word treble is now used to describe the voice of either sex.
A boy can sing treble until he reaches puberty. At puberty he starts to become a man and his voice range will go down (we say that his voice “breaks”). He will then become a tenor, baritone or bass, or he may even train to be a countertenor. A girl’s voice also changes when she reaches puberty, but the change into a grown-up female voice is more gradual than with a boy, and it is still within the soprano or alto range.
Boys who join a cathedral choir or the choir of a large church will have to work hard to develop their voice and learn to sing musically. They often start this training aged 7 or 8, and they may only have four or five years before their voice starts to break. They do not usually become famous as soloists, but the Welsh treble Aled Jones became very famous for about three years and made many recordings before his voice broke in 1987.
The word ‘treble’ is used for children singing in a Classical Music style, especially church music. Although children do not usually sing in opera, occasionally a treble is used for the part of a very small boy, e.g. in Debussy’s opera Pélléas et Mélisande."
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"Benachrichtigung, Bericht, Angabe, Ankündigung, Bekanntgabe, Bereitmeldung, Bereitschaftserklärung, Berichterstattung, Bescheid, Botschaft, Information, Kundgabe, Nachricht, Rapport, Meldung"
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"Trajekt, Transfer, Transformation, Transgression, Transhimalaya, Transistor, Transit, Transkription, Transkulturation, Transsylvanien, Transmission, Transpiration, Transport, Transuran, Transversale, Transzendenz, Travestie"
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"Walkabout refers to a rite of passage during which male Australian Aborigines would undergo a journey during adolescence and live in the wilderness for a period as long as six months.
In this practice they would trace the paths, or "songlines", that their ancestors took, and imitate, in a fashion, their heroic deeds. Merriam-Webster, however, identifies the noun as a 1908 coinage referring to "a short period of wandering bush life engaged in by an Australian Aborigine as an occasional interruption of regular work", with the only mention of "spiritual journey" coming in a usage example from a latter-day travel writer."
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